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Who was Cassandra?


  • In the Iliad, she is described as the loveliest of the daughters of Priam (King of Troy), and gifted with prophecy. The god Apollo loved her, but she spurned him. As a punishment, he decreed that no one would ever believe her. So when she told her fellow Trojans that the Greeks were hiding inside the wooden horse...well, you know what happened.

MY SMALL PRESS


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July 25, 2007

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News has it that tropical birds are appearing more frequently in Canada. I'd guess that bumblebees have been there for quite a while already. When you discover the community garden in the 'hood, just remember that in Montreal, the sun sets in the north, and all will be well........letting go is scary, especially when one does it in a big way, but all shall be well, and all manner of things, etc.

Thanks, Scott.

There is a house near the village that has been long-abandoned and left to the ivy and grasses, shrubs and small trees that have now totally covered it. On some still evenings I swear I hear the stones sighing as they settle back into the earth...

To everything there is a season...

Hello!

I'm commenting here because it appears that you close comments to previous entries.

My name is David Schneider. I'm the founder/editor of an online magazine of arts and ideas called The Boy Bedlam Review (http://www.boybedlamreview.com). I was very taken with your three-part meditation on Eliot and Heaney (The Wasteland and Bog People) and would very much like to reprint it for the next issue of The Boy Bedlam Review. We will, of course, provide links to this blog as well as any other of your endeavors you'd like to promote.

Please take a look at the site -- I think you'll be pleasantly surprised -- and let me know what you think.

Thank you very much.

Sincerely,
David Schneider
Editor
http://www.boybedlamreview.com

What a stunning photo, Beth! And I love this post. I'm always amazed how quickly nature can take over if left alone, especially in the rainforest. As you write, it can be good thing...

It's the ability of the non-human world to reclaim space that consistently heartens me. Sometimes I visualize pavement cracking, and weeds growing up through, young maples sprouting in the gutters of abandoned houses, mice making nests in drawers of clothing left behind... it sounds morbid, but it comforts me, thinking about how ephemeral our individual lives are, and how strong life itself is.

Beth, commentators on the floods here in the UK have been highlighting the fact that so many people now concrete over their front gardens (often for car parking) and clear out the back gardens for patios/decking etc. : there's no place for the rain to soak away. Apart form the unsightliness factor - and i can't bear to see weeds sprouting from concrete - to me it looks sad.

A radio playing all day - definitely time to go.

Anna.

nature can certainly in the sort term outwit and outlive the idiot suburbanites.

Nature left alone produces the most wonderful displays. After a few years of tears my husband finally understood my distress and hired a fellow to cut our lawn who respected my desire to let nature take it's course along the woods and in certain garden areas.

Now we enjoy so many more butterflies and some really wonderful berries that we didn't even know we had.

How is global warming effecting the situation wehere you are. Here in Spain we are havignt to replan everything - plantings, fruit, our natural visotrs such as birds and insects.

@Rana - is the flooding just one symptom of this?

Sorry about the blank post there!

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